Monday, July 21, 2014

Republican Senate Majority Leader Richardville supports expanding Michigan’s anti-discrimination law to cover sexual orientation

Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville said last week that he personally supports expanding Michigan’s anti-discrimination law to cover sexual orientation.

Richardville indicated “it would be possible to start the
Randy Richardville -R- (right) getting chummy
with  Gubernatorial Candidate Mark Schauer -D- (left)
discussion as early as September” on introducing such legislation to amend the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act, Richardville spokeswoman Amber McCann said Thursday. His initial comments came during a Thursday morning taping of “Off the Record,” the Michigan Public Television show hosted by Tim Skubick.

“Hatred’s a bad thing,” Richardville said.
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Before the start of summer recess in mid-June, Richardville had said he wanted to take a close look at the issue before deciding whether to hold a vote.

The Senate majority leader’s support comes after Gov. Rick Snyder in late May backed the idea of a legislative debate on whether Michigan should protect gays and lesbians from workplace discrimination.

The Republican governor made his comments at the Mackinac Policy Conference, sponsored by the Detroit Regional Chamber, as three large Michigan companies, Chrysler Group LLC,  Pfizer and Kellogg  joined a coalition to lobby lawmakers to make it illegal to discriminate against someone based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

Snyder stopped short of fully endorsing a change to the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act, a 38-year-old law that bans denying someone a job or housing opportunity based on their religion, race, color, national origin, age, sex, height, weight, familial status or marital status.

“I’m not taking a position on the actual issue at this point, but saying let’s get it in front of the Legislature, let’s have a dialogue and discussion, and hopefully get some resolution on this issue,” Snyder said at the conference on Mackinac Island.


Here is the problem with Richardville and Snyder's proposals.  By saying you do not want to discriminate against the homosexual population, who on their own accord choose a lifestyle that goes against the laws of nature, is to discriminate against those of religious faith. 

The three major religions, Christians, Jews and Muslims all consider homosexuality a grave sin against God. By forcing a church, synagogue or mosque is to discriminate against their faith. To force a Christian Book Store owner to hire a homosexual is to discriminate against their faith. To force a Jewish, Muslim or Christian Bakery to make a wedding cake for a homosexual couple is to discriminate against their faith. To force a Jewish, Muslim or Christian photographer to take pictures for a homosexual couple is to discriminate against their faith. 

The First amendment protects religious freedoms in this country. I suggest Senator Richardville and our other leaders in Lansing study the Constitution!

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